Wedding Day of Joeseph Gyanapraksan (head waiter at the India Club). India Club. 17th September 1966. Courtesy of David Joeseph. Via National Trust.

The India Club, at 143 Strand, is in trouble. And it’s not for the first time. First, for those who have not experienced its wonders, quick history lesson. The India Club was established in 1951, moving to its 143 Strand premises in 1964. It was the base of the India League (who organised for British…

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The medieval street network around the Strand and into the City, from seventeenth-century plans attributed to Robert Hooke.

In the wake of the Great Fire of London (September 1666), many speculative entrepreneurs reinvented themselves as urban developers. These individuals were the major figures of the modernisation of London’s street network. Laying out regular streets over freshly-bought land and building rows of similar (if not identical) terrace houses proved the best way to maximise…

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10 Adam Street has a famous-looking front door. You can pose in front of its glossy black paint, brass metalwork, and stone steps, pretending to pay a visit to that other Number 10. However, I would suppose, the mood inside both buildings couldn’t be more different. Helen greets me when I arrive, with shoes off…

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Introduction In my earliest posts on Strandlines, I focused heavily on a bastion of Strand history: The Savoy. Over time I diversified my interests and desired to find the more niche and hidden stories of this great viaduct. Unsurprisingly, however, when I decided to look into depictions of the Strand in film over time the…

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Maureen Duffy and Liz Mathews, with host Katie Webb.

On 25th November 2020, we held an online event to celebrate the launch of Strandlines‘s special collection on Maureen Duffy. We heard from Maureen about her latest work; the forthcoming publication of her first children’s book Sadie and the Seadogs, illustrated by Anita Joice, and her 20th novel, After Eve. Maureen also read two poems…

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The pandemic has undoubtedly emptied out London streets, all its buzzy hangout spots, workplaces and cultural epicentres. As essential workers continue to uphold the skeleton of the city and restaurants endeavour to provide the necessary sustenance (still managing to fit in a hello to the customers, often half in, half out, of alignment with the…

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Aged parchment paper with a large written heading and several blocks of written text.

Today, the name of London’s most recognizable street, the Strand, evokes images of Trafalgar Square’s lions, the iconic Somerset and Bush houses, and, most of all, busied sidewalks alive with Londoners. Those images, while impressive to locals and tourists alike, are tied rather arbitrarily to their street’s name. What brought the name to the place?…

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The Strand from the corner of Villiers Street by George Scharf, 1824 (British Museum)

Villiers Street has always captivated me. Linking the Strand to the Embankment, it remains one of the most vibrant walkways in the area and it plays an important part in connecting people to some of central London’s main visitor attractions – historical buildings and palaces, galleries, theatres, cinemas, museums and parks. It has a buzzy…

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